Brasil Sete— ‘Meditaçao’ At Thredbo Jazz Festival and Snow Bikini Contest* 2014

Ok, so there was no “Snow Bikini Contest”. But now that I have your attention, know that ‘Brasil Sete’ is an extemporaneous collective of fine Sydney-based musicians who are passionate about Brasilian music and great music of any genre. The band is comprised of Sandro Bueno, Fabian Hevia, Dane Laboyrie, Tiago de Lucca, Rafael Nazario, Andrew Oh and Jonathan Zwartz. Many of the songs performed were classic and lesser-known Brasilian tunes, as well as great originals by Tiago de Lucca. (Unfortunately, Sandro Bueno and Fabian Hevia, OUR FINE PERCUSSIONISTS cannot be seen in this video. But they’re there alright.)

*Rumor has it there was a “Snow Bunny Contest” taking place nearby.

Brasil Sete — Essa Moça Ta Diferente (Thredbo Jazz Festival 2014)

‘Brasil Sete’, an extemporaneous collective of fine Sydney-based musicians who are passionate about Brasilian music and great music of any genre. The band is comprised of Sandro Bueno, Fabian Hevia, Dane Laboyrie, Tiago de Lucca, Rafael Nazario, Andrew Oh and Jonathan Zwartz. Many of the songs performed were classic and lesser-known Brasilian tunes, as well as great originals by Tiago de Lucca.

(Unfortunately, Sandro Bueno and Fabian Hevia, OUR FINE PERCUSSIONISTS cannot be seen in this video. But they’re there!)

El Paseo — Latin Orchestral Jazz

This project is officially on back burner for the time being… The dream is to premiere it in San Juan, with a real orchestra. For now, I’ve imputed all the notes via Logic and Sibelius.

On Piano Teaching —Raf Nazario

A short overview of how I teach beginning piano.

A sentence is a collection of words assembled to convey meaning. In music we have chords.

That is what the musical phrase is, a collection of assembled chords that convey a notion; instead of vowels and consonants we have notes—naturals, sharps and flats. Words contain vowels and consonants. Chords contain notes. In many pieces of music, the notes spell out the chords. (Not dissimilar to the way consonants and vowels spell out words.)

That’s why I teach chords first, what I call “chord literacy”. If a piano player can read chords, she or he can decipher and play almost any popular song.

Knowing what the chords are in a classical piece helps not just to understand the harmony involved but is also a great aid in memorising the piece.

Most people are taught piano as an exercise in mechanical reproduction. They too often start by learning pieces that bare no emotional relevance to the individual’s musical tastes or their age. They learn music as a series of rules, dogmatic, unyielding, unforgiving; often taught by instructors who take a disciplinarian approach to piano teaching—coercing rather than coaching. Imposing the dogma of repetition. The student dutifully trudging through ‘Für Elise’ in a manner that almost guarantees he or she will hate Beethovenfor the rest of their lives.

I believe teaching people how to read music without them understanding what they’re playing is like teaching kids to read aloud without them understanding what they’re saying.

If I Could I’d Send You Roses (Demo)

Unabashedly sentimental love ballad, the kind of plaintive tune often heard in the Country Music realm. I consider it a kind of English language riposte to the song [in Spanish] I uploaded last week (‘Si Yo Pudiera’, from my first CD); albeit they deal with different “if I could…” themes.

It’s a Demo, which means the actual recording of it will sound different. Heck, I might even try doing it as a Country ballad.

This will be part of my upcoming ‘Songs From The Sky’ project. Out this fall. Stay tuned. :-)

Si Yo Pudiera (Bolero ‘Tangón’)

I wrote this song shortly after we moved to Puerto Vallarta, Mexico; part of my first CD, “Patria Añorada” which I recorded the other musicians in Mexico City at Mextli Studios and laid down my vocals and other keyboards in the studios of Jorge Patrono, in Los Angeles.

My original idea was to record it as a Bolero with a “Tango” air. The challenge was that I knew no one who actually played bandeoneón, the beautiful Argentine descendant of the Concertina. The day I arrived in Mexico City, on the eve of our recording sessions, I visited the studio for the first time, and there I found Cesar Olguin, who just happened to be there recording some tracks for another project. I had the great fortune of having the best musicians in Mexico for this project, a detail I shall always be grateful for.

English Transliteration, “If I Could Tell You”

If my heart could find a way
to let you know
how a heart could ache
and never show
how a heart can break
and not let go
how I would have you know
if my heart could only tell you

If it could tell you it would say
it never understood
why you had to go
why all this sadness
and if only you could
explain this madness
for with your love
went all of my tomorrows

And with tomorrow
went the tender ways
I once held you
and the warmth of your caresses
now there’s a distant sun,
a winter inside of me
a solitary fortress
for you’re the one
that my heart misses
and if by chance someone we knew were to ask you…
“whatever happened to…?”
“was it a case of treason..?”
Maybe by then you’ll say
what were your reasons
and when you do
remember how I loved you

The years go by and hoping
for a glimpse of you
I haunt the crowded highways
and in sifting through the things
and places we once knew
I find that I still love you
my broken heart knows how
I loved you

The day will come
when a friend will ask of you
and I will say the best
the best of what we gave
and fold the rest
into a silent wave
because silence
was the very last
the last thing you gave me

I store all these emotions
these volumes of devotion…
days go unattended
life goes on un-mended

walking though I’m sinking
hurting yet still thinking
about you, life without you

It’s no story, no invention…
a pain I dare not mention
I live under a darkened constellation
where stars never shine
still blinded by the light of days
when I was yours
and you were mine
could I go on pretending
with this sorrow never ending

Now I’m longing for a new day
a brand new tomorrow
reaching to the past
for innocence to borrow
I call out your name
and with my heart I quarrel
how can I get over you
when will this be through?

A day will come when
someone known will ask of you
and I will say the best
the best of what we gave
my heart will say the rest
with a silent wave
because silence was
the very last,
the last thing that you gave me.

______________________

English lyrics by Rafael A. Nazario, ©1999

Cinematic Sonata II “Murasaki” 紫色の雨—music for Meditation

The second movement to my musical triptych, ‘Cinematic Sonata’, a work for Piano and Keyboards. Each movement is named after a colour. (‘Murasaki’ is Japanese for purple, or Violet.) I used an excerpt of this for the ‘Shadow Yoga’ video, also available for viewing on this channel.